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I refuse to even hold my nose and vote a lesser evil. From the New York Review of Books article, The Clinton System:

wikileaks-tpp-investment-cartoon[D]irect payments to Hillary Clinton’s political campaigns, including for the Senate in 2000 and for the presidency in 2008 and now in 2016 … had reached a total of$712.4 million as of September 30, 2015. Major donors include four of the world’s largest banks: Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan Chase and Morgan Stanley.

With Susie, the real debate:

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[Not that this isn’t ed] a fair take; but I happen to be of the opinion that getting Democrats everyone to vote in every election is a much more effective and immediate fix than anything else on the table, but I [too] could be wrong:

One final thing Hillary cannot say, but which many Democrats intuitively grasp, is that her nomination lets her party postpone a reckoning. The Republican coalition has broken apart, blown up by leadership duplicity. Democrats are in better shape, but they still have considerable fissures of their own. Their party elite favors globalism and free trade; their non-elite prefers more nationalism and protectionism. In papering over these splits, the Obama coalition has focused increasingly on civil rights injustices related to gender or race. But this is an unsustainable approach, further alienating white working-class voters and fostering internal squabbles over who deserves what. Only the fear of a common foe, the GOP, keeps the peace. Bernie Sanders, by shifting the focus away from identity and over to economic justice, is inviting Democrats to have it out. Hillary Clinton, by contrast, is inviting Democrats to keep it in. Even if she’s not a natural unifier, she embodies the idea of “Democrat,” and that spares people from having to examine it more closely. Political parties don’t like to think, and with Hillary Clinton they don’t have to. Maybe there’s a Clinton campaign t-shirt in that: Don’t overthink it. Just vote Hillary. Or maybe not. But it doesn’t matter. Either way, the outcome is the same: she wins.

Vote Hillary! Vote the status quo (more of the same).

Writes a letter to the editor, rips The Oregonian a new blowhole…

The Oregonian’s A1 headline on Sunday, Jan. 17, “Effort to free federal lands,” is inaccurate and irresponsible. The article that follows it is a mere mouthpiece for the scofflaws illegally occupying public buildings and land, repeating their lies and distortions of history and law.

Ammon Bundy and his bullyboys aren’t trying to free federal lands, but to hold them hostage. I can’t go to the Malheur refuge now, though as a citizen of the United States, I own it and have the freedom of it. That’s what public land is: land that belongs to the public — me, you, every law-abiding American. The people it doesn’t belong to and who don’t belong there are those who grabbed it by force of arms, flaunting their contempt for the local citizens.

Those citizens of Harney County have carefully hammered out agreements to manage the refuge in the best interest of landowners, scientists, visitors, tourists, livestock and wildlife. They’re suffering more every day, economically and otherwise, from this invasion by outsiders.

Instead of parroting the meaningless rants of a flock of Right-Winged Loonybirds infesting the refuge, why doesn’t The Oregonian talk to the people who live there?

Ursula K. Le Guin
Northwest Portland

Award-winning author Ursula K. Le Guin has lived in Oregon for more than half a century, and has regularly visited the region surrounding the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge for 45 years.

Those bozos have been asked to leave, and would do well to get the fuck out before the locals take matters into their own. Haven’t hanged anybody out there since nineteen sixty-two.

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Including the 27 amendments, the Constitution of the United States of America contains 7,591 words. Not one of those 7,591 words are: god, christianity, christian, jesus, christ, lord, commandment, new testament, or bible.

If you’re not god-damned liars, you’re god-damned fools, and a clear and present danger to my grandchildren’s survival.

Fear me.

Loons that have taken over a bird sanctuary.

The media in aggregate – corporate and internet – needs to stop treating these bozos like they’re anything more than two-bit punks musketsvandalizing what amounts to a tourist kiosk that’s closed for the winter. It isn’t the Alamo, all these pukes had to do was bust out a window and open the door. Not even burglary, breaking and entering.

Told to piss off, they are vandalizing a place pretty much everyone on The Oregon High Desert has a stake in. They’re just a bunch of snot-nosed white punks on dope throwing a tantrum because they didn’t get their way.

Go ahead, point your little popgun at the US Army.

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The People v Racist Mascots rally against the Washington White Dogs mascot and logo today, Sunday January 3rd 2016 (pig era) 8:00 am till noon, AT&T Stadium, Arlington Texas.

Or “Democrats behaving as Republicans” …

The Lady points to an observation Matt Yglesias made last October: “Democrats are in denial. Their party is actually in deep trouble.

But the much more significant question facing the party isn’t about the White House – it’s about all the other offices in the land. The problem is that control of the presidency seems to have blinded progressive activists to the possibility of even having an argument about what to do about all of them. That will change if and when the GOP seizes the White House, too, and Democrats bottom out. But the truly striking thing is how close to bottom the party is already and how blind it seems to be to that fact

If the depth of denial were measured by the stunning degree of viscous, mean-spirited, churlish attacks by Clinton supporters these past few weeks upon those who are not, I’d venture that like the Y2K nuts Yglesias is right, but he hasn’t quite got his fingers wrapped all the way around it. It was bad eight years ago, today it is downright republican. And it certainly isn’t encouraging me to hold my nose and vote the status quo, vote the lesser evil.

imagesIt’s long been my contention the Retards threw the elections to Obama, as they are now throwing it to Clinton. I used to ask “why?” Now I ask how it is that seemingly otherwise relatively well adjusted, well educated people cannot see that they are being quite professionally herded to vote a decision that has already been made and all of this is naught but a charade to leave the rubes feeling as if they were participant?

After what the Weasels did earlier this year to the most popular Governor in the history of The State of Oregon, re-elected only months earlier to an unprecedented fourth term, I am already as disgusted with Democrats as I am repelled by Republicans. Attacking me, attacking those who disagree with Retard-like skill and tactic isn’t going to change any minds. It certainly isn’t going change mine.

Never am I so much reminded of Dr. Zhivago (the book, not the shitty movie) as when I read the comments at the so-called “liberal” blogs: fat, not necessarily white middle class bourgeoisie sitting around drinking wine and smoking weed pontificating on what they would do if they could change the world, yet when the opportunity to change the world presents itself the vast majority toe the mark, or are quite rapidly, and presumably gratefully, dead.

Like the world my grandchildren are growing up in, if we don’t seize the opportunity to change.

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From Eureka California to Eureka Montana!

There is nothing east of The Rockies we need.

Einstein famously declared that when the bees go, in four years we will go.

This month’s Rolling Stone has a very good article up about just that, and why we cannot seem to keep them from dying…

Supposedly standing guard between the tiny pollinators and the agrochemical giants is the EPA. It’s the EPA’s job to parse all this, and if not to fully protect the environment, per se, then at least to make sure that one particular industry doesn’t ruin nature to such an extent that it too drastically hurts the bottom line of others. In 1972, revisions to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act placed the responsibility on manufacturers to provide the safety data for the products they make, the idea being that American taxpayers should not cover the bill for tests done to products that financially benefit private companies. In practice, what this means is that the studies provided to the EPA when a product is up for approval are, by law, generated and submitted by the manufacturer of that product. Jim Jones, the assistant administrator for the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention at the EPA, maintains that compliance monitoring is designed to keep companies honest: “They have to generate the data according to good laboratory practices, and our scientists review this.” Loarie, the attorney for Earthjustice, isn’t so sure. “I think there are many, many opportunities for the data to be played with,” he says.

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Also of concern then is the fact that agrochemical companies are not only responsible for reporting how much environmental exposure a pesticide might have, they’re likewise responsible for submitting to the EPA’s review the lethal dose for non-target organisms — what amount it would take to kill 50 percent of a population. “It’s the fox guarding the henhouse,” says Ramon Seidler, a former senior research scientist in charge of the GMO Biosafety Research Program at the EPA. “And the fox is the one collecting the eggs and bringing them to the regulators.”

Even if the EPA wanted to test a product itself, the agency isn’t set up that way. EPA scientists are meant to review studies conducted by others (including independent research), not to conduct studies themselves. It can take the agency two to three years to do a full review of a commercial product. “And with 80,000-some-odd of these chemicals to do?” says Seidler. “My God, it’s an impossible task.”

For this reason, regulators mainly consider a compound’s active ingredient, which, as the entomologist vanEngelsdorp explains, can be problematic. “There is data that the inert ingredients may be having a negative effect on colonies on their own,” he says. “Or that in combination with the active ingredient, they’re much more toxic than they were before.” Nor are regulators generally considering the combinations of multiple insecticides and herbicides sometimes coated on a single seed or how any of this might interact with the other agrochemicals applied to crops, a chemical bath that the program director for the Pollinator Stewardship Council, Michele Colopy, calls “meth in the field.”

“It’s the fox guarding the henhouse,” says a former EPA research scientist. “It’s corporate greed over environmental safety.”

“We do look for some obvious interactions, but you can’t test for every possible combination of chemicals that might occur out in the real world,” says Fischer. Yet it’s unclear what the agrochemical companies are testing: Because they contain “proprietary information,” the insecticides’ nonactive ingredients are not publicly disclosed.

Despite these limitations, many feel that the body of evidence against neonics is strong enough that the EPA should be taking a stand. Which raises certain questions. “Why did the Europeans put a hold on the use of neonicotinoids?” Seidler asks. “And why did the EPA look at that and stare it right in the face and say, ‘No’?” Why is the EPA not restricting neonics when another government agency, the Fish and Wildlife Service, announced that it would phase them out on national wildlife refuges by 2016?

In fact, just three days after the European ban was announced, the USDA/EPA National Stakeholders Conference on Honey Bee Health issued its report in which the potential harm posed by neonics was not mentioned at all in the executive summary. “That really got to me,” says Dr. Eric Chivian, founder and former director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment at Harvard Medical School. “There was huge international press attention that the EU banned the most widely used insecticides in the world because of concern about honeybees, and the part of the report most people read doesn’t even mention them?” At the EPA/USDA Pollinator Summit in March 2013, less than two months after the EU issued its initial neonic warnings, “Half the speakers were from industry,” says Chivian. “It would be as if the Surgeon General held a conference on the dangers of smoking and half the speakers were from Big Tobacco.”

No one is saying that what the EPA is tasked with comes easy. “Go after Congress,” Seidler says. “They are the ones who are not providing a sufficient budget for the EPA and other regulatory scientists to stay up with industry discoveries.” Indeed, the number of laboratories serving the office of the pesticide program at the EPA has dropped from a reported dozen in 1971 to two today, which means it’s very difficult for the EPA to keep pace with industry. “It’s always a challenge,” says the EPA’s Jones, who maintains that despite the difficulties, the agency is resourced and operating adequately. But according to Loarie, “They’re using 20th-century methodologies to test 21st-century pesticides. The EPA still doesn’t appreciate the extent to which systemic pesticides are different.”

With their livelihoods in the balance, beekeepers have grown frustrated with the EPA’s lack of action. “I’ve been going to Washington for years working on these issues, basically asking them to do their job, and my experience has been that generally the agencies don’t understand, and their approach doesn’t get to the heart of the problem,” says Zac Browning, a fourth-generation Idaho beekeeper who lost 50 percent of his hives in 2009. “On the ground, we’re not seeing results.”

What beekeepers are seeing, however, is that chemical companies — and their lobbyists — seem effective at fighting off tougher standards. “The problem is that industry knocks on the door and walks in,” says Doan. “Beekeepers knock on the door, and it’s like, ‘Hold on, we’ll see you in a while.’  Industry has an open door into the EPA and beekeepers do not.”

Read that last line again: Industry has an open door and beekeepers do not.”

It’s the fox guarding the henhouse, corporate greed over environmental safety.

You fucking animals are destroying the world my grandchildren are growing up in, and I think it is about time to do something about that. You really should fear me.

So put down the Ambien, Prozac, Viagra and crotch-shots on Fox Kool-Aid and turn off the television, because Republican President Theodore Roosevelt, in a speech On Why Environmentalism Is A ‘Patriotic Duty’, defined what it was to be a progressive, and why the true nationalists and patriots were progressives, and environmentalists, and you ain’t it:

Of all the questions which can come before this nation, short of the actual preservation of its existence in a great war, there is none which compares in importance with the great central task of leaving this land even a better land for our descendants than it is for us, and training them into a better race to inhabit the land and pass it on. Conservation is a great moral issue for it involves the patriotic duty of insuring the safety and continuance of the nation. …

“I ask nothing of the nation except that it so behave as each farmer NASA-March2015-256x171here behaves with reference to his own children,” Roosevelt explained in the speech. “That farmer is a poor creature who skins the land and leaves it worthless to his children. The farmer is a good farmer who, having enabled the land to support himself and to provide for the education of his children leaves it to them a little better than he found it himself. I believe the same thing of a nation.”

Roosevelt then immediately pointed out, “Let me add that the health and vitality of our people are at least as well worth conserving as their forests, waters, lands, and minerals, and in this great work the national government must bear a most important part.” And he was blunt about the solution:

There can be no effective control of corporations while their political activity remains. To put an end to it will be neither a short nor an easy task, but it can be done….

It is necessary that laws should be passed to prohibit the use of corporate funds directly or indirectly for political purposes; it is still more necessary that such laws should be thoroughly enforced.

Here are some more quotes that define progressivism and Teddy Roosevelt — and distinguish him from modern day wannabes:

  • The “greatest good for the greatest number” applies to the number within the womb of time, compared to which those now alive form but an insignificant fraction. Our duty to the whole, including the unborn generations, bids us restrain an unprincipled present-day minority from wasting the heritage of these unborn generations. The movement for the conservation of wild life and the larger movement for the conservation of all our natural resources are essentially democratic in spirit, purpose, and method.
  • If in a given community unchecked popular rule means unlimited waste and destruction of the natural resources — soil, fertility, waterpower, forests, game, wild-life generally — which by right belong as much to subsequent generations as to the present generation, then it is sure proof that the present generation is not yet really fit for self-control, that it is not yet really fit to exercise the high and responsible privilege of a rule which shall be both by the people and for the people. The term “for the people” must always include the people unborn as well as the people now alive, or the democratic ideal is not realized.
  • The conservation of natural resources is the fundamental problem. Unless we solve that problem it will avail us little to solve all others.
  • The United States at this moment occupies a lamentable position as being perhaps the chief offender among civilized nations in permitting the destruction and pollution of nature. Our whole modern civilization is at fault in the matter. But we in America are probably most at fault … Here in the United States we turn our rivers and streams into sewers and dumping-grounds, we pollute the air, we destroy forests and exterminate fishes, birds and mammals’not to speak of vulgarizing charming landscapes with hideous advertisements.
  • To waste, to destroy, our natural resources, to skin and exhaust the land instead of using it so as to increase its usefulness, will result in undermining in the days of our children the very prosperity which we ought by right to hand down to them.

This is what it means to be a progressive in the tradition of Teddy Roosevelt.

The bottom line is it is immoral for one generation to destroy another generation’s vital soil — or its livable climate.

You are an enemy of the American People, enemy of the American Way of Life.

And a clear and present danger to my grand-children’s future.

Fear me.

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